The Medical Book Warzone... Which book is best?

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The Medical Book Warzone... Which book is best?

As the days are slowly getting longer, and spring looms in the near future, it can only be the deep inhale of the medical student ready to embrace the months of revision that lies ahead. Books are dusted off the shelves and Gray's anatomy wrenched open with an immense sigh of distain. But which book should we be pulling off the shelves? If you're anything like me then you're a medical book hoarder. Now let me "Google define" this geeky lexis lingo - a person who collects medical books (lots of medical books) and believes by having the book they will automatically do better!... I wish with a deep sigh! So when I do actually open the page of one, as they are usually thrown across the bed-room floor always closed, it is important to know which one really is the best to choose?!?

These are all the crazy thoughts of the medical book hoarder, however, there is some sanity amongst the madness. That is to say, when you find a really good medical book and get into the topic you start to learn stuff thick and fast, and before you know it you’ll be drawing out neuronal pathways and cardiac myocyte action potentials. Yet, the trick is not picking up the shiniest and most expensive book, oh no, otherwise we would all be walking around with the 130 something pounds gray’s anatomy atlas. The trick is to pick a book that speaks to you, and one in which you can get your head around – It’s as if the books each have their own personality.

Here are a list of books that I would highly recommend:

Tortora – Principles of anatomy and physiology

Tortora is a fantastic book for year 1 medical students, it is the only book I found that truly bridges the gap between A levels and medical students without going off on a ridiculous and confusing tangent.

While it lacks subtle detail, it is impressive in how simplified it can make topics appear, and really helps build a foundation to anatomy and physiology knowledge
The whole book is easy to follow and numerous pretty pictures and diagrams, which make learning a whole lot easier.

Tortora scores a whopping 8/10 by the medical book hoarder

Sherwood – From cells to systems

Sherwood is the marmite of the medical book field, you either love this book or your hate it.

For me, Sherwood used to be my bible in year two. It goes into intricate physiological detail in every area of the body. It has great explanations and really pushes your learning to a greater level than tortora in year one. The book doesn’t just regurgitate facts it really explores concepts.

However:

I cannot be bias, and I must say that I know a number of people who hate this book in every sense of the word. A lot of people think there is too much block text without distractions such as pictures or tables. They think the text is very waffly, not getting straight to the point and sometimes discusses very advanced concepts that do not appear relevant
The truth be told, if you want to study from Sherwood you need to a very good attention span and be prepared to put in the long-hours of work so it’s not for everyone. Nonetheless, if you manage to put the effort in, you will reap the rewards!

Sherwood scores a fair 5-6/10 by the medical book hoarder

Moore & Dalley – Clinical anatomy

At first glance Moore & Dalley can be an absolute mindfield with an array of pastel colours that all amalgamate into one! It’s also full of table after table of muscle and blood vessels with complicated diagrams mixed throughout. This is not a medical book for the faint hearted, and if your foundation of anatomy is a little shakey you’ll fall further down the rabbit hole than Alice ever did.

That being said, for those who have mastered the simplistic anatomy of tortora and spent hours pondering anatomy flash cards, this may be the book for you.
Moore & Dalley does not skimp on the detail and thus if you’re willing to learn the ins and out of the muscles of the neck then look no further. Its sections are actually broken down nicely into superficial and deep structures and then into muscles, vessels, nerves and lymph, with big sections on organs.

This is a book for any budding surgeon!

Moore & Dalley scores a 6/10 by the medical book hoarder

Macleod’s clinical examination

Clinical examination is something that involves practical skills and seeing patients, using your hands to manipulate the body in ways you never realised you could. Many people will argue that the day of the examination book is over, and it’s all about learning while on the job and leaving the theory on the book shelf.

I would like to oppose this theory, with claims that a little understanding of theory can hugely improve your clinical practice.

Macleod’s takes you through basic history and examination skills within each of the main specialties, discussing examination sequences and giving detailed explanations surrounding examination findings. It is a book that you can truly relate to what you have seen or what you will see on the wards. My personal opinion is that preparation is the key, and macleod’s is the ultimate book to give you that added confidence become you tackle clinical medicine on the wards

Macleod’s clinical examination scores a 7/10 by the medical book hoarder

Oxford textbook of clinical pathology

When it comes to learning pathology there are a whole host of medical books on the market from underwood to robbins. Each book has its own price range and delves into varying degrees of complexity. Robbins is expensive and a complex of mix of cellular biology and pathophysiological mechanisms. Underwood is cheap, but lacking in certain areas and quite difficult to understand certain topics. The Oxford textbook of clinical pathology trumps them all.

The book is fantastic for any second year or third year attempting to learn pathology and classify disease. It is the only book that I have found that neatly categories diseases in a way in which you can follow, helping you to understand complications of certain diseases, while providing you with an insight into pathology.

After reading this book you’ll be sure to be able to classify all the glomerulonephritis’s while having at least some hang of the pink and purples of the histological slide.

Oxford textbook of clinical pathology scores a 8/10 by the medical book hoarder

Medical Pharmacology at glance

Pharmacology is the arch nemesis of the Peninsula student (well maybe if we discount anatomy!!), hours of time is spent avoiding the topic followed immediately by hours of complaining we are never taught any of it. Truth be told, we are taught pharmacology, it just comes in drips and drabs. By the time we’ve learnt the whole of the clotting cascade and the intrinsic mechanisms of the P450 pathway, were back on to ICE’ing the hell out of patients and forget what we learned in less than a day.

Medical pharmacology at a glance however, is the saviour of the day. I am not usually a fan of the at a glance books. I find that they are just a book of facts in a completely random order that don’t really help unless you’re an expert in the subject. The pharmacology version is different: It goes into just the right amount of detail without throwing you off the cliff with discussion about bioavailability and complex half-life curves relating to titration and renal function.

This book has the essential drugs, it has the essential facts, and it is the essential length, meaning you don’t have to spend ours reading just to learn a few facts!

In my opinion, this is one of those books that deserves the mantel piece!

Medical Pharmacology at a glance scores a whopping 9/10 by the medical book hoarder.

Anatomy colouring book

This is the last book in our discussion, but by far the greatest. After the passing comments about this book by my housemates, limited to the sluggish boy description of “it’s terrible” or “its S**t”, I feel I need to hold my own and defend this books corner. If your description of a good book is one which is engaging, interesting, fun, interaction, and actually useful to your medical learning then this book has it all.

While it may be a colouring book and allows your autistic side to run wild, the book actually covers a lot of in depth anatomy with some superb pictures that would rival any of the big anatomical textbooks. There is knowledge I have gained from this book that I still reel off during the question time onslaught of surgery.

Without a doubt my one piece of advice to all 1st and 2nd years would be BUY THIS BOOK and you will not regret it!

Anatomy colouring book scores a tremendous 10/10 by the medical book hoarder

Let the inner GEEK run free and get buying:)!!

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Written by Benjamin Norton

TBC

Comments

What do you think about this blog post?
75fb023b8b749c83c52efef77e894928
1009

Fantastic comprehensive post. Thank you!!

about 1 year
7abe979eb8f6c34a82b4fdb5f3ce521b
3

thank you..!!

about 1 year
1ed6d25b5077094381064315ab6fd62f
5

It is better to give the prise and this effort is appreciated

about 1 year
7c8840d9079d2b4ec4427fb486841856
49

I like Medical Sciences by Naish et al- its the basic sciences sister text to kumar and clark- not great for anatomy, but good on everything else.

about 1 year
5058b564bf5c36b850dc64c5de3da990
24

Brilliant!

about 1 year
14c73db7b0927f790000c527260bf8b7
3631

Thanks for the contribution

about 1 year
2b68e9658bafe87b736c06c6cc412cbd
161

Love Medical Pharmacology at a glance!

about 1 year
2e23f870aaeb6a752ac16eee6fd6946a
3

Thank you so much

about 1 year
84148217b848b5eeaa80abe2821d9e44
1

great post! thank you.

about 1 year

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