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Ureaplasma urealyticum

Ureaplasma urealyticum is a bacterium belonging to the family Mycoplasmataceae. Its type strain is T960.

Clinical significance

U. urealyticum is part of the normal genital flora of both men and women. It is found in about 70% of sexually active humans.

It had also been described to be associated with a number of diseases in humans, including non-specific urethritis (NSU), infertility, chorioamnionitis, stillbirth, premature birth, and, in the perinatal period, pneumonia, bronchopulmonary dysplasia.1 and meningitis.

However, given the relatively low pathogenicity of the organism its role in some of these diseases remains contentious.

Classification

There are six recognised Ureaplasma species, They have a GC content of 27-30%, and a genome size ranging between 0.76-1.17 Mbp, and cholesterol is required for growth. A defining characteristic of the genus is that they perform urea hydrolysis.

It is now recommended that some strains originally classified as Ureaplasma urealyticum should be treated as a new species, U. parvum.

Treatment

Doxycycline is the drug of choice; streptomycin is an alternative but is less popular because it must be injected. Penicillins are ineffective — U. urealyticum doesn't have a cell wall, which is the drug's main target.

External links

References

  1. ^ Kafetzis DA, Skevaki CL, Skouteri V, et al (October 2004). 'Maternal genital colonization with Ureaplasma urealyticum promotes preterm delivery: association of the respiratory colonization of premature infants with chronic lung disease and increased mortality'. Clin. Infect. Dis. 39 (8): 1113–22. doi:10.1086/424505. PMID 15486833. http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/cgi-bin/resolve?CID32584.  http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/cgi-bin/resolve?CID32584

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